Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Enjoy the now

We are always striving to be somewhere else. If we are in school we are wishing that we are done with school. When we are working we are wishing for the day when we have enough money to stop working. If we are single we want to be married. If we don't have a house we can't wait until we can afford the down payment.

Which is all fine. But the problem is a lot of us delay our happiness and tie it to the new thing or the new state we will be in the future. We tell ourselves "I'll be happy when..."

But this kind of thinking is a trap. What makes you think you'll be happy when you get to that spot. It might be further along the path but just as before there is another hill in the distance, an even greener pasture.

This Alan Watts video put it beautifully. We keep thinking it's coming, it's coming.. one day we are going to get that success. And then one day we wake up and we are 40 realize, shit, it's not supposed to be like a journey where we are trying to get to the end. It's more like a musical or a dance, where we are supposed to fully enjoy it, every step of the way.

I'm a budding indie developer with very few customers, very little revenue. I'm going to try to enjoy this for as long as I can.

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Hidden Costs

Just read this NYT article The Streets Were Never Free which talks about how there is a general perception that the use of public roads and parking spaces is free. For most commodities, when the demand of it goes up, the price of it goes up as well. However, not so for roads. Thus the congestion as everyone wants to use the roads during rush hour.

To clarify, most people do know that the streets are not actually free since their taxes pay for it, however since the cost is not directly paid each time, there is less of a direct association, and thus roads can seemingly seem free.

It reminds me of the recent news of China and India refusing to take America's trash. I think that has built a sense that producing waste is nearly free. People see the $50 that they pay to have their recycling and trash taken but the idea of environmental costs were largely hidden because it was someone else's problem.

Another way to put it is, because of the hidden costs and subsidies people don't have enough skin in the game. The tighter the feedback loop the better. Thus the congestion and the trash in our face will be a good thing long term as we will finally have to face up to the problem. The traffic isn't going to get better on its own. At what point is the 3+ hour commute just not worth it? Hopefully we don't need to wait to see the full effects of burning our plastics and trash before we take action.